Online video forces change on TV industry

Having turned print media upside down, the Internet now is disrupting television, forcing broadcasters to adapt to tablets and video-on-demand to hold onto views and advertisers.

There's more than one way to connect

It's not enough these days to wonder what to watch on your TV; a growing question for many is how to watch. Just like any device in your life, TVs can now connect to the Internet. This lets you grab shows from the Internet ...

Review: HP Sleekbook 15 combines size, style

My experience with Windows 8 has been limited to a few devices, including the Microsoft Surface, so I was happy to get the opportunity to review the Hewlett-Packard Pavilion Sleekbook 15, a fairly inexpensive laptop.

Intel roadmap leaked for SoC with Ivy Bridge graphics

(PhysOrg.com) -- Bridges, trails, piers, and trees are familiar territory words for world travelers but for Intel workers they are more importantly code words and a number of them that are planted on the Intel roadmap have ...

Video game console case offers gaming on the go

(AP) -- Console gaming on the go just got easier thanks to a mobile gaming kit that comes with a built-in high-definition display screen to connect to your Xbox 360 or Sony PlayStation system.

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HDMI

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a compact audio/video interface for transmitting uncompressed digital data. It is a digital alternative to consumer analog standards, such as radio frequency (RF) coaxial cable, composite video, S-Video, SCART, component video, D-Terminal, or VGA (also called D-sub or DE-15F). HDMI connects digital audio/video sources (such as set-top boxes, DVD players, HD DVD players, Blu-ray Disc players, AVCHD camcorders, personal computers (PCs), video game consoles (such as the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Wii U), AV receivers, tablet computers, and mobile phones) to compatible digital audio devices, computer monitors, video projectors, and digital televisions.

HDMI implements the EIA/CEA-861 standards, which define video formats and waveforms, transport of compressed, uncompressed, and LPCM audio, auxiliary data, and implementations of the VESA EDID. HDMI supports, on a single cable, any uncompressed TV or PC video format, including standard, enhanced, high definition and 3D video signals; up to 8 channels of compressed or uncompressed digital audio; a Consumer Electronics Control (CEC) connection; and an Ethernet data connection.

The CEC allows HDMI devices to control each other when necessary and allows the user to operate multiple devices with one remote control handset. Because HDMI is electrically compatible with the CEA-861 signals used by digital visual interface (DVI), no signal conversion is necessary, nor is there a loss of video quality when a DVI-to-HDMI adapter is used. As an uncompressed CEA-861 connection, HDMI is independent of the various digital television standards used by individual devices, such as ATSC and DVB, as these are encapsulations of compressed MPEG video streams (which can be decoded and output as an uncompressed video stream on HDMI).

Production of consumer HDMI products started in late 2003. In Europe, either DVI-HDCP or HDMI is included in the HD ready in-store labeling specification for TV sets for HDTV, formulated by EICTA with SES Astra in 2005. HDMI began to appear on consumer HDTV camcorders and digital still cameras in 2006. Shipments of HDMI were expected to exceed that of DVI in 2008, driven primarily by the consumer electronics market. HDMI Licensing, LLC announced on October 25, 2011 that there were over 1,100 HDMI Adopters and that over 2 billion HDMI enabled products have shipped since the launch of the HDMI standard. Starting on October 25, 2011, all future development of the HDMI specification will be done through a new organization called the HDMI Forum.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA