Researchers identify the microbes in 100-year-old snail guts

On a drizzly day in July 1920, a Colorado scientist named Junius Henderson was hiking around the Dakota Hogback, a sandstone ridge north of Boulder. There, he spotted a group of Rocky Mountain snails (Oreohelix strigosa) ...

Understanding how microbiota thrive in their human hosts

A research team lead by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology, Tübingen, Germany, has now made substantial progress in understanding how gut bacteria succeed in their human hosts on a molecular level. They ...

Styrofoam-munching superworms could hold key to plastic upcycling

Packing material, disposable cutlery, CD cases: Polystyrene is among the most common forms of plastic, but recycling it isn't easy and the vast majority ends up in landfills or finds its way to the oceans where it threatens ...

Rapid, single-cell analysis of microbiotas now possible

A single-cell method developed by RIKEN biophysicists, that can rapidly classify hundreds of thousands of bacteria according to species, promises to be an invaluable tool for discovering how gut, skin, ocean and soil microbes ...

Bacteria with recording function capture gut health status

Researchers from ETH Zurich, University Hospital of Bern and the University of Bern have equipped gut bacteria with data logger functionality as a way of monitoring which genes are active in the bacteria. These microorganisms ...

How bacteria evade bacteriophages in vivo

Phage therapy, which uses viruses known as bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections, is a long-standing medical procedure whose mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and ...

Viruses that could save millions of lives

It may seem strange after a pandemic that has killed millions and turned the world upside down, but viruses could save just as many lives.

This is your gut on sushi

The next time you get a craving for sushi rolls, you may feel a renewed appreciation for the ocean. It's to thank not only for your fish and seaweed wrapper, but, as a new Michigan Medicine study suggests, for the bacteria ...

Examining why locusts form destructive swarms

Researchers at Tel Aviv University found that the microbiome of a solitary locust undergoes a profound change when the host joins a group: bacteria called Weissella, almost completely absent from the microbiome of solitary ...

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