Glacial microclimates mimic climate change

A cool pocket climate around the snout of a glacier could help researchers predict how forests will respond to fast climate change, according to the authors of a new 120-year case study of a rapidly advancing and retreating ...

Understanding tremors through tree rings

When trying to make sense of past earthquakes, researchers typically turn to the geological record. However, there may be clues to understanding old quakes in the biological record as well—in tree rings, for example. As ...

Europeans in the Americas 1,000 years ago

Columbus was not the first European to reach the Americas. The Vikings got there centuries before, although exactly when has remained unclear. Here, an international team of scientists show that Europeans were already active ...

New York City's hidden old-growth forests

In the popular imagination, New York City is a mass of soaring steel-frame skyscrapers. But many of the city's 1 million buildings are not that modern. Behind their brick-and-mortar facades, its numerous 19th- and early 20th-century ...

Research identifies climate-change refugia in dry-forest region

Several indicators point to the adverse impacts of climate change on the planet's vegetation, but a little-known positive fact is the existence of climate-change refugia in which trees are far less affected by the gradual ...

Southern African dinosaur had irregular growth

Anyone who's raised a child or a pet will know just how fast and how steady their growth seems to be. You leave for a few days on a work trip and when you come home the child seems to have grown an inch! That's all well and ...

Forests go into growth 'overdrive' to recover from drought

One in 12 people could face severe drought every year by 2100, according to a recent study. And water stored on two-thirds of the Earth's land surface will shrink as the climate warms. As plant ecologists, we're concerned ...

As sea ice disappears, a greener and browner Arctic emerges

Arctic sea ice has been in steep decline over the past two decades. A study of tundra shrubs published today in the journal PNAS shows that as sea ice disappears, the Arctic is becoming both greener and browner.

page 1 from 5