Can we tell someone's cultural group from the way they laugh?

Can we infer someone's cultural group from their laugher, even when we do not know what they are laughing at? And what kind of laughter do we find most positive? A new study by researchers from the University of Amsterdam ...

Societal divisions could hinder EU climate policy

Many contemporary political conflicts are between those who would prioritize the needs of local or national communities and those with a more universal outlook. According to a new study by IASS researcher Silvia Weko, this ...

Friends matter: Giraffes that group with others live longer

A research team led by Monica Bond, research associate at the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies of the University of Zurich (UZH), studied giraffes in Tanzania for five years. The biologists examined ...

Considering social influences across the customer journey

Researchers from Emory University, University of Maryland, Vanderbilt University, and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that re-examines the classic customer ...

Adolescent bully and peer intervention

It starts with a joke, then maybe a jab. Then another joke, another jab. Then maybe the bullying escalates, or maybe it stays at a low simmer, barely even acknowledged except by the victim. Does anyone say anything to stop ...

What trade deals can teach us about the animal kingdom

From Brexit to Donald Trump's first acts as US president, the news has been full of discussion about trade agreements recently. But trade agreements aren't just relevant to human politics. Exchange of commodities happens ...

Group identity emphasized more by those who just make the cut

People and institutions who are marginal members of a high-status or well-esteemed group tend to emphasize their group membership more than those who are squarely entrenched members of the group, according to new research ...

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