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Making it count: The power of round numbers

Round numbers can be powerful marketing tools, increasing people's sense of accomplishment as they work towards goals in areas like finances or weight loss, according to new Washington State University research.

Preschoolers can do more math than you think

Preschoolers are capable of learning more complicated math concepts than most parents realize, according to a new Vanderbilt study. What's more, these concepts can be easily introduced through simple games and tasks at home.

Too much inequality impedes support for public goods

Too much inequality in society can result in a damaging lack of support for public goods and services, which could disadvantage the rich as well as the poor, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business ...

How much would you pay to change a game before playing it?

When most people think of a "game," they might imagine checkers or hopscotch. But in game theory, a game is defined as any type of scenario where there's an interaction between different decision-makers, or players, each ...

Yelp ratings get better when they cost something—like time

An international team of researchers tested the idea that free online ratings are less trustworthy than those that have some cost to them, drawing from the ecological theory known as "costly signaling theory."

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Game

A game is a structured activity, usually undertaken for enjoyment and sometimes used as an educational tool. Games are distinct from work, which is usually carried out for remuneration, and from art, which is more concerned with the expression of ideas. However, the distinction is not clear-cut, and many games are also considered to be work (such as professional players of spectator sports/games) or art (such as jigsaw puzzles or games involving an artistic layout such as Mah-jongg solitaire).

Key components of games are goals, rules, challenge, and interaction. Games generally involve mental or physical stimulation, and often both. Many games help develop practical skills, serve as a form of exercise, or otherwise perform an educational, simulational or psychological role. According to Chris Crawford, the requirement for player interaction puts activities such as jigsaw puzzles and solitaire "games" into the category of puzzles rather than games.

Attested as early as 2600 BC, games are a universal part of human experience and present in all cultures. The Royal Game of Ur, Senet, and Mancala are some of the oldest known games.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA