Related topics: climate change · drought · rainfall

Stormy waters ahead for coastal towns: what are the options?

Australians love property and being near water. But fast forward 30 years and the two may be incompatible, judging by global forecasts warning of sea level rises that could threaten thousands of coastal residents in decades ...

New satellite may make flood prediction easier

A satellite on schedule to launch in 2021 could offer a more comprehensive look at flooding in vulnerable, under-studied parts of the world, including much of Africa, South America and Indonesia, a new study has found.

Death toll from Spain floods rises to five

Three more people died as torrential rain and flash floods battered southeastern Spain, raising the death toll to five with the rising waters causing havoc for travellers and forcing 3,500 people from their homes, officials ...

Multiple flood events erode neighborhood spirit, study finds

A Rice University study examining the social and political reactions of people in post-Hurricane Harvey Houston found that while first-time flood victims may still feel strong ties to their neighborhoods, this emotional attachment ...

Hurricane Dorian lashes Carolinas after Bahamas havoc

Hurricane Dorian, which reduced much of the northern Bahamas to rubble and left at least 20 people dead, whipped the Carolinas Thursday, bringing lashing winds, heavy rainfall and the threat of dangerous storm surge to the ...

Biologists uncover a way to waterproof plants

Scientists at Utrecht University have discovered how some plants can quickly detect that they are under water when flooded, and initiate processes that prevents them from drowning. Floods cause widespread yield losses annually ...

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Flood

A flood is an overflow or accumulation of an expanse of water that submerges land. In the sense of "flowing water", the word may also be applied to the inflow of the tide. Flooding may result from the volume of water within a body of water, such as a river or lake, which overflows or breaks levees, with the result that some of the water escapes its normal boundaries. While the size of a lake or other body of water will vary with seasonal changes in precipitation and snow melt, it is not a significant flood unless such escapes of water endanger land areas used by man like a village, city or other inhabited area.

Floods can also occur in rivers, when the strength of the river is so high it flows out of the river channel, particularly at bends or meanders and causes damage to homes and businesses along such rivers. While flood damage can be virtually eliminated by moving away from rivers and other bodies of water, since time out of mind, people have lived and worked by the water to seek sustenance and capitalize on the gains of cheap and easy travel and commerce by being near water. That humans continue to inhabit areas threatened by flood damage is evidence that the perceived value of living near the water exceeds the cost of repeated periodic flooding.

The word "flood" comes from the Old English flod, a word common to Germanic languages (compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float). The specific term "The Flood," capitalized, usually refers to the great Universal Deluge described in the Bible, in Genesis, and is treated at Deluge.

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