Related topics: sharks

Lungfish fins reveal how limbs evolved

The evolution of limbs with functional digits from fish fins happened approximately 400 million years ago in the Devonian. This morphological transition allowed vertebrates to leave the water to conquer land and gave rise ...

Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials

Thousands of chemical processes used by the energy industry and for other applications rely on the high speed of catalytic reactions, but molecules frequently are hindered by molecular traffic jams that slow them down. Now ...

New species of Ichthyosaur discovered in museum collection

Hauffiopteryx altera (Latin for different from) has been identified as a new species of Ichthyosaurs by researchers from McGill University and the State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart in Germany.

Just add nano-materials for stronger, tougher diving fins

Adding microscopic nano-materials to carbon fibre composites has resulted in stronger, tougher fins for divers. A space material company teamed up with a market leader in the design and production of free-diving and spear-fishing ...

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Fin

A fin is a surface used for stability and/or to produce lift and thrust or to steer while traveling in water, air, or other fluid media, (in other words, a foil (fluid mechanics)). The first use of the word was for the limbs of fish, but has been extended to include other animal limbs and man-made devices. Fins, as with other foils, operate in fluids such as water or air.

Fins are seen both in nature and in manmade iterations.

Swimming water animals such as fish and cetaceans actively use pectoral fins for maneuvering, and dorsal fins contribute stability as the animal swims, propelling and maneuvering with its tail, itself recognizable as a fin.

The fin on fixed-wing aircraft is known as a vertical stabilizer. Fins are also seen used as e.g., fletching on arrows and at the rear of some bombs, missiles, rockets, and self-propelled torpedoes. These are typically "planar" (shaped like small wings), although grid fins are sometimes used in specialized cases.

Examples of fins include:

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA