Building bricks from plastic waste

Revolutionary 'green' types of bricks and construction materials could be made from recycled PVC, waste plant fibers or sand with the help of a remarkable new kind of rubber polymer discovered by Australian scientists.

Monitoring glaciers with optical fibers

Seismic monitoring of glaciers is essential to improving our understanding of their development and to predicting risks. SNSF Professor Fabian Walter has come up with a new monitoring tool in the form of optical fibers. The ...

Transporting energy through a single molecular nanowire

Photosynthetic systems in nature transport energy very efficiently toward a reaction center, where it is converted into a useful form for the plant. Scientists have been using this as inspiration to learn how to transport ...

Researchers catch light in a funnel

Professor Ronny Thomale holds a chair for theoretical condensed matter physics, the TP1, at the Julius-Maximilian University of W├╝rzburg. The discovery and theoretical description of new quantum states of matter is a prime ...

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Fiber

Fiber (also spelled fibre) is a class of materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread.

They are very important in the biology of both plants and animals, for holding tissues together.

Human uses for fibers are diverse. They can be spun into filaments, string, or rope, used as a component of composite materials, or matted into sheets to make products such as paper or felt. Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. The strongest engineering materials are generally made as fibers, for example carbon fiber and Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene.

Synthetic fibers can often be produced very cheaply and in large amounts compared to natural fibers, but for clothing natural fibers can give some benefits, such as comfort, over their synthetic counterparts.

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