UM study finds microplastic pollution in Flathead Lake

They're in our oceans and rivers. They're in the food we eat and the water we drink. They've even been detected inside the human body. They're called microplastics—particles of plastic so small they can't be seen by the ...

Research shows superior COVID protection from better face masks

New research from the University of Surrey and the University of Bristol has shown that FFP2 (filtering facepiece) respirator masks are five times more efficient at filtering particles that carry the COVID-19 virus than cloth ...

Modified silk cloth keeps skin cooler than cotton

A team of researchers affiliated with a host of entities in China and one in the U.S. has developed a modified textile that can keep skin cooler than materials made of cotton. In their paper published in the journal Nature ...

page 1 from 32

Textile

A textile or cloth is a flexible woven material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt).

The words fabric and cloth are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. Textile refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. Fabric refers to any material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). Cloth may be used synonymously with fabric but often refers to a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., table cloth).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA