Using emotion and humor to combat science misinformation

Misinformation in public debates about scientific issues such as vaccinations and climate change can be found all over the internet, especially on social media. In a new study, Sara K. Yeo, associate professor of communication ...

New study shows real-time stress reaction to racism

A new study by researchers from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and University of Texas at Austin provides more evidence that the stress of racism contributes to health problems among people of color.

Do rats like to be tickled?

Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalizations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response, according to new research by the University of Bristol. The study, published ...

Multitasking in the workplace can lead to negative emotions

From writing papers to answering emails, it's common for office workers to juggle multiple tasks at once. But those constant interruptions can actually create sadness and fear and eventually, a tense working environment, ...

The face of a mouse reveals its emotions: study

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology are the first to describe emotional facial expressions for mice. Similar to humans, mouse facial expressions change when it tastes something sweet or bitter, or when ...

Love matters: How parents' love shapes children's lives

Parents often put their own relationship on the back burner to concentrate on their children, but a new study shows that when spouses love each other, children stay in school longer and marry later in life.

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