Robots reading feelings

Robots are getting smarter—and faster—at knowing what humans are feeling and thinking just by "looking" into their faces, a development that might one day allow more emotionally perceptive machines to detect changes in ...

Preventing toxic work environments through ethical leadership

Recently published research from SDSU management professor, Dr. Gabi Eissa and University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire management professor, Dr. Rebecca Wyland, shows that "managers who demonstrate ethical leadership through ...

When cash is your enemy

Researchers have known for years that parting from cash can be a psychologically painful experience for many people—much more so than spending money with a credit or debit card. The emotional discomfort is significant enough ...

Researchers teach neural networks to determine crowd emotions

Scholars from the Higher School Of Economics have developed an algorithm that detects emotions in a group of people on a low-quality video. The solution provides a final decision in just one hundredth of a second, which is ...

Emotional exhaustion takes a toll on entrepreneurial ventures

Emotional exhaustion caused by role ambiguity and work-family conflicts can lead many entrepreneurs to leave or close their companies, even when the ventures are profitable, says a Ball State University researcher.

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Emotion

An emotion is a mental and physiological state associated with a wide variety of feelings, thoughts, and behavior. Emotions are subjective experiences, or experienced from an individual point of view. Emotion is often associated with mood, temperament, personality, and disposition. The English word 'emotion' is derived from the French word émouvoir. This is based on the Latin emovere, where e- (variant of ex-) means 'out' and movere means 'move'. The related term "motivation" is also derived from movere.

No definitive taxonomy of emotions exists, though numerous taxonomies have been proposed. Some categorizations include:

A related distinction is between the emotion and the results of the emotion, principally behaviors and emotional expressions. People often behave in certain ways as a direct result of their emotional state, such as crying, fighting or fleeing. Yet again, if one can have the emotion without the corresponding behaviour then we may consider the behavior not to be essential to the emotion. The James-Lange theory posits that emotional experience is largely due to the experience of bodily changes. The functionalist approach to emotions (e.g. Nico Frijda) holds that emotions have evolved for a particular function, such as to keep the subject safe.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA