Related topics: molecules

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Plastics are all around us—they make up our water bottles, trash bags, packing materials, toys, containers, and more. About 300 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide each year, yet the details of what goes on at ...

Probing battery hotspots for safer energy storage

Researchers are striving to make tomorrow's batteries charge faster and store more energy. But these conveniences come with safety challenges, like more heat produced in a battery. For the first time, a team of researchers ...

Fabrics that protect against chemical warfare agents

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Testing radiation resistance without using a nuclear reactor

The University of Huddersfield's combined electron microscope and ion beam accelerator is a world-class facility responsible for a large and growing global network of research collaborations. One of the latest is a partnership ...

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Electron microscope

An electron microscope is a type of microscope that uses a particle beam of electrons to illuminate a specimen and create a highly-magnified image. Electron microscopes have much greater resolving power than light microscopes that use electromagnetic radiation and can obtain much higher magnifications of up to 2 million times, while the best light microscopes are limited to magnifications of 2000 times. Both electron and light microscopes have resolution limitations, imposed by the wavelength of the radiation they use. The greater resolution and magnification of the electron microscope is because the wavelength of an electron; its de Broglie wavelength is much smaller than that of a photon of visible light.

The electron microscope uses electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses in forming the image by controlling the electron beam to focus it at a specific plane relative to the specimen. This manner is similar to how a light microscope uses glass lenses to focus light on or through a specimen to form an image.

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