Related topics: molecules

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Evidence suggests that carbon nanotubes, tiny tubes consisting of pure carbon, could be forged in the envelopes of dust and gas surrounding dying stars. The findings propose a simple, yet elegant mechanism for the formation ...

Investigating electrons with a traditional scanning microscope

Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have designed a framework that allows scientists to observe interactions between light and electrons using a traditional scanning electron microscope. ...

Smallest earthquakes ever detected in micron-scale metals

On the micrometer scale deformation properties of metals change profoundly: The smooth and continuous behavior of bulk materials often becomes jerky due to random strain bursts of various sizes. The reason for this phenomenon ...

Peering into the structure of antibiotic resistance

Michigan State University's Ben Orlando is a structural biologist who studies some of nature's smallest machines, sees how they are put together and figures out how they work. He's currently focused on proteins that bacteria ...

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Electron microscope

An electron microscope is a type of microscope that uses a particle beam of electrons to illuminate a specimen and create a highly-magnified image. Electron microscopes have much greater resolving power than light microscopes that use electromagnetic radiation and can obtain much higher magnifications of up to 2 million times, while the best light microscopes are limited to magnifications of 2000 times. Both electron and light microscopes have resolution limitations, imposed by the wavelength of the radiation they use. The greater resolution and magnification of the electron microscope is because the wavelength of an electron; its de Broglie wavelength is much smaller than that of a photon of visible light.

The electron microscope uses electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses in forming the image by controlling the electron beam to focus it at a specific plane relative to the specimen. This manner is similar to how a light microscope uses glass lenses to focus light on or through a specimen to form an image.

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