Why bats fly into walls

Bats excel in acoustic perception and detect objects as tiny as mosquitoes using sound waves. Echolocation permits them to calculate the three-dimensional location of both small and large objects, perceiving their shape, ...

Mobile phones help Americans encounter more diverse news

In recent years, we've heard a lot about "news bubbles" and "echo chambers," the idea that to validate their own worldviews, liberals read liberal news and conservatives read conservative news. The proliferation of partisan ...

The return of the spin echo

A research team from Garching and Vienna discovered a remarkable echo effect that offers exciting new possibilities for working with quantum information.

Radio waves detect particle showers in a block of plastic

When neutrinos crash into water molecules in the billion-plus tons of ice that make up the detector at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica, more than 5,000 sensors detect the light of subatomic particles produced ...

Drones can determine the shape of a room by listening

Imagine a loudspeaker is placed in a room with a few microphones. When the loudspeaker emits a sound impulse, the microphones receive several delayed responses as the sound reverberates from each wall in the room. These first-order ...

Bats use leaves as mirrors to find prey in the dark

On moonless nights in a tropical forest, bats slice through the inky darkness, snatching up insects resting silently on leaves—a seemingly impossible feat. New experiments at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute ...

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