Related topics: current biology · fruit flies

Young genes found to adapt faster than old ones

A new study from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön and the University of Sussex in the UK shows that the age of a gene determines how fast they adapt. These findings demonstrate how gene evolution ...

A window into the fruit fly's nervous system

Scientists at EPFL have developed an implantation technique that allows unprecedented optical access to the "spinal cord" of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This work can potentially lead to breakthroughs in the fields ...

CRISPR-based technology targets global crop pest

Applying new CRISPR-based technology to a broad agricultural need, researchers at the University of California San Diego have set their aims on a worldwide pest known to decimate valuable food crops.

Can a parasitic wasp save your fruit crops?

The wasp species Asobara japonica (A. japonica) is a parasitic organism, meaning it sustains its life by hijacking resources from a host such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The wasp mother can secrete a venom full ...

An arms race that plays out in a single genome

Biological arms races are commonplace in nature. Cheetahs, for example, have evolved a sleek body form that lends itself to rapid running, enabling them to feast upon similarly speedy gazelles, the fastest of which may evade ...

NeuroMechFly: A digital twin of Drosophila

EPFL scientists have developed a digital model of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, that realistically simulates the movements of the animal. The twin is a big step towards reverse engineering the neuromechanical control ...

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