Moss capable of removing arsenic from drinking water discovered

Moss capable of removing arsenic from contaminated water has been discovered by researchers from Stockholm University. Within just one hour, it reduces water arsenic to levels harmless enough for consumption. The study has ...

Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking water

Globally, remaining tropical forests are being rapidly cleared, particularly in countries like the Solomon Islands where commercial logging accounts for about 18 percent of government revenue, and at least 60 percent of exports ...

Water purification breakthrough uses sunlight and 'hydrogels'

According to the United Nations, 30,000 people die each week from the consumption and use of unsanitary water. Although the vast majority of these fatalities occur in developing nations, the U.S. is no stranger to unanticipated ...

Smartphone sensor can detect dirty water

Denmark, like many other European countries, is lucky. When we pour ourselves a refreshing glass of tap water, we generally don't need to worry about bacteria.

The sorry state of Earth's species, in numbers

The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) issued a dire diagnosis Friday of Earth's plant and animal species.

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