Are microplastics pervasive in Nigerian drinking water?

In Nigeria, about 90% of water available for drinking is sourced from boreholes, or deep, narrow wells that tap into naturally occurring underground water. A recent study in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry found that ...

Three of Tonga's smaller islands badly damaged by tsunami

Three of Tonga's smaller islands suffered serious damage from tsunami waves, officials and the Red Cross said Wednesday, as a wider picture begins to emerge of the destruction caused by the eruption of an undersea volcano ...

Pandemic saw sales of bottled water dip in Asia Pacific

Measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 caused a decline in the sales of bottled water across the Asia Pacific region during 2020, according to a study by the global market research firm, Euromonitor International.

Tests show lead in Benton Harbor tap water finally dropping

The amount of lead in Benton Harbor, Michigan's drinking water has declined, new testing shows, after three straight years of elevated results compelled residents to consume bottled water and prompted a hurried effort to ...

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Drinking water

Drinking water is water of sufficiently high quality that it can be consumed or used without risk of immediate or long term harm. Such water is commonly called potable water. In most developed countries, the water supplied to households, commerce and industry is all of drinking water standard, even though only a very small proportion (often 5% or less) is actually consumed or used in food preparation.[citation needed]

Over large parts of the world, humans have inadequate access to potable water and use sources contaminated with disease vectors, pathogens or unacceptable levels of dissolved chemicals or suspended solids. Such water is not potable and drinking or using such water in food preparation leads to widespread acute and chronic illness and is a major cause of death in many countries.

Typically, water supply networks deliver potable water, whether it is to be used for drinking, washing or landscape irrigation. One counterexample is urban China, where drinking water can optionally be delivered by a separate tap.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA