Related topics: marriage

Navigating the new landscape of LGBTQ divorce

The right to marry means same-sex couples have gained access to thousands of state and federal benefits like social security benefits and inheritance rights. But it also means the right to divorce. In their new book, LGBTQ ...

Are joint custody and shared parenting a child's right?

Many families with children separate all around the world. In France, for instance, nearly 200,000 children per year are affected by the divorce of their parents. After divorce, just over seven out of ten children (73%) live ...

Older adults embracing 'living apart together'

Since 1990, the divorce rate among adults 50 years and older has doubled. This trend, along with longer life expectancy, has resulted in many adults forming new partnerships later in life. A new phenomenon called 'Living ...

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Divorce

Divorce (or the dissolution of marriage) is the final termination of a marital union, canceling the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage and dissolving the bonds of matrimony between the parties (unlike annulment which declares the marriage null and void). Divorce laws vary considerably around the world but in most countries it requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process. The legal process for divorce may also involve issues of spousal support, child custody, child support, distribution of property and division of debt. Where monogamy is law, divorce allows each former partner to marry another; where polygyny is legal but polyandry is not, divorce allows the woman to marry another.

Between 1971 and 2011, five European countries legalised divorce: Italy, Spain, Portugal, Ireland and Malta. This leaves two countries in the world—the Philippines and Vatican City—that do not have a civil procedure for divorce.

"Divorcing one's parents" is a term sometimes used to refer to emancipation of minors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA