70 years of high Danube temperatures indicate climate change

Today, only the eldest inhabitants of the Danube Delta recall that the river froze nearly every winter; since the second half of the 20th century, Europe's second-largest river has only rarely frozen over. This is due to ...

Sentinels catch traffic jam

Low water levels in the Danube river have left ships to queue close to the town of Zimnicea in Romania.

ESA image: Hungarian mosaic

This image of Hungary, with the political border in white, is a mosaic of 11 scans by Sentinel-1A's radar from October to December 2014.

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Danube

The Danube (English pronunciation: /ˈdænjuːb/ dan-yoob) is a river in the Central Europe and the Europe's second longest river after the Volga. It is classified as an international waterway.

The river originates in the Black Forest mountain range in Germany as the much smaller Brigach and Breg rivers which join at the German town of Donaueschingen. After that it is known as the Danube and flows southeastward for a distance of some 2,872 km (1,785 mi), passing through four Central and Eastern European capitals, before emptying into the Black Sea via the Danube Delta in Romania and Ukraine.

Known to history as one of the long-standing frontiers of the Roman Empire, the river flows through or acts as part of the borders of ten countries: Germany (7.5%), Austria (10.3%), Slovakia (5.8%), Hungary (11.7%), Croatia (4.5%), Serbia (10.3%), Bulgaria (5.2%), Moldova (1.6%), Ukraine (3.8%) and Romania (28.9%). (The percentages reflect the proportion of the total Danube drainage basin area).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA