Research could help point the finger at drug dealers

An innovative technology pioneered by Sheffield Hallam University academics can detect the presence of a range of illegal and designer drugs from a single fingerprint, which could be a valuable new tool in bringing drug dealers ...

Bacteria on shoes could help forensic teams catch suspects

Prospective criminals should take note: bacteria are everywhere. A small pilot study has shown that the germs on personal belongings such as shoes and mobile phones are actually a useful way of tracing a person's whereabouts ...

Crime scene discovery—separating the DNA of identical twins

Since its first use in the 1980s - a breakthrough dramatised in recent ITV series Code of a Killer - DNA profiling has been a vital tool for forensic investigators. Now researchers at the University of Huddersfield have solved ...

Hair dye 'CSI' could help police solve crimes

Criminals with a penchant for dyeing their hair could soon pay for their vanity. Scientists have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. ...

Nanoparticles give up forensic secrets

A group of researchers from Switzerland has thrown light on the precise mechanisms responsible for the impressive ability of nanoparticles to detect fingermarks left at crime scenes.

Dead body feeding larvae useful in forensic investigations

Non-biting blow fly Chrysomya megacephala is commonly found in dead bodies and is used in forensic investigations to determine the time of death, referred to as the post mortem interval. A report of synanthropic derived form ...

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