Related topics: earth

Plate tectonics goes global

Today, the entire globe is broken up into tectonic plates that are shifting past each other, causing the continents to drift slowly but steadily. But this has not always been the case.

Plate tectonics research rewrites history of Earth's continents

Curtin University-led research has found new evidence to suggest that the Earth's first continents were not formed by subduction in a modern-like plate tectonics environment as previously thought, and instead may have been ...

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Continent

A continent is one of several very large landmasses on Earth. They are generally identified by convention rather than any strict criteria, with seven regions commonly regarded as continents—they are (from largest in size to smallest): Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia.

Plate tectonics is the geological process and study of the movement, collision and division of continents, earlier known as continental drift.

For people in Britain and Ireland, in spite of being a part of Europe themselves, the expression "the Continent" may also refer to Continental Europe, that is, the mainland of Europe, excluding the British Isles, Iceland and some other islands.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA