Killer sea snail a target for new drugs

University of Queensland pain treatment researchers have discovered thousands of new peptide toxins hidden deep within the venom of just one type of Queensland cone snail.

Predatory sea snails produce weaponized insulin

As predators go, cone snails are slow-moving and lack the typical fighting parts. They've made up for it by producing a vast array of fast-acting toxins that target the nervous systems of prey. A new study reveals that some ...

Cone snails have multiple venoms

(Phys.org) —Cone snails change "weapons" depending on whether they are hunting or defending themselves, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

Cone snails are for life and not just at Christmas

Those who fly to tropical shores this Christmas in search of sea and sun may be unaware that an exotic shell picked from the beach could potentially bring relief to many thousands of people suffering life-threatening illnesses.

Venomous snail key behind therapeutic molecules

Can a painkiller be re-engineered to get a closer look at how proteins bind to communication channels? Researchers across Europe are using state-of-the-art computing techniques to re-engineer a painkiller from the XEP-018 ...

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