Ships slowing in busy channel to protect endangered orcas

Ships moving through a busy channel off Washington state's San Juan Island are slowing down this summer as part of a study to determine whether that can reduce noise and benefit a small, endangered population of killer whales.

Marine vessels are unsuspecting hosts of invasive species

Invasive ascidians—sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders—are nuisance organisms that present a global threat. They contribute to biodiversity loss, ecosystem degradation and impairment of ecosystem services around ...

Panama saves whales and protects world trade

The Republic of Panama's proposal to implement four Traffic Separation Schemes for commercial vessels entering and exiting the Panama Canal and ports was approved unanimously by the International Maritime Organization in ...

Conducting cool summer research in the Arctic

The Arctic Coastal Ecosystems Survey (ACES) is focused on understanding the ecological role of near-shore and lagoon habitats of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas that surround Alaska and its connectivity with the coastal ocean. ...

Sediment discovery could save millions

New research tracking the movement of dredged sediment around Liverpool Bay could save millions of pounds, according to scientists at the National Oceanography Centre in Liverpool.

New requirements for ballast water dumped by ships

(AP)—The Environmental Protection Agency has issued new requirements for cleansing ballast water dumped from ships, which scientists believe has brought invasive species to U.S. waters that damage ecosystems and cost the ...

European fish stocks to be counted

Counting every single fish in the European seas may sound as likely as finding a mermaid, but it seems the world of technology has no boundaries.

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