Related topics: light

Researchers shrink camera to the size of a salt grain

Micro-sized cameras have great potential to spot problems in the human body and enable sensing for super-small robots, but past approaches captured fuzzy, distorted images with limited fields of view.

Why is the North American fall so red compared with Europe?

Each fall, the leaves of almost half of North America's species of trees and shrubs turn red. But why is bewitching autumn foliage—to borrow from Mark Twain—so common in New England, but not in Europe?

Trapping spins with sound

The captured electrons typically absorb light in the visible spectrum, so that a transparent material becomes colored under the presence of such centers, for instance in diamond. "Color centers are often coming along with ...

Why some of Darwin's finch nestlings have yellow beaks

Carotenoids are the underlying pigment for much of the enormous variety of color found across birds and form the basis for the colors red, yellow and orange. In a study published in Current Biology, researchers from Uppsala ...

Colorblind fish reveal how vision evolved

After decades of studying color vision in mice, new research in zebrafish has allowed experts at the University of Tokyo to uncover how some animals regulate their ability to see blue light. The results, published in Science ...

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Color

Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, green, blue and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates.

Because perception of color stems from the varying spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance.

The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what we commonly refer to simply as light).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA