Related topics: light

System to image the human eye corrects for chromatic aberrations

Researchers report a new imaging system that cancels the chromatic optical aberrations present in a specific person's eye, allowing for a more accurate assessment of vision and eye health. By taking pictures of the eye's ...

Recovering color images from scattered light

Engineers at Duke University have developed a method for extracting a color image from a single exposure of light scattered through a mostly opaque material. The technique has applications in a wide range of fields from healthcare ...

Exoplanet evolution: Astronomers expand cosmic 'cheat sheet'

Cornell astronomers have reached into nature's color palette from early Earth to create a cosmic "cheat sheet" for looking at distant worlds. By correlating tints and hues, researchers aim to understand where discovered exoplanets ...

The secret of mushroom colors

The fly agaric with its red hat is perhaps the most evocative of the diverse and variously colored mushroom species. Hitherto, the purpose of these colors was shrouded in mystery. Researchers at the Technical University of ...

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Color

Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, green, blue and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates.

Because perception of color stems from the varying spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance.

The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what we commonly refer to simply as light).

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