Shape-encoded dynamic assembly of mobile micromachines

Field-directed and self-propelled colloidal assembly can be used to build micromachines to perform complex motions and functions, although their integration as heterogenous components with specified structures, dynamics and ...

Scientists offer designer 'big atoms' on demand

In the not-so-distant future, researchers may be able to build atoms to your specifications with the click of a button. It's still the stuff of science fiction, but a team at the University of Colorado Boulder reports that ...

Coffee-based colloids for direct solar absorption

Solar energy is one of the most promising resources to help reduce fossil fuel consumption and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions to power a sustainable future. Devices presently in use to convert solar energy into thermal ...

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Colloid

A colloid is a substance microscopically dispersed evenly throughout another substance.

A colloidal system consists of two separate phases: a dispersed phase (or internal phase) and a continuous phase (or dispersion medium). A colloidal system may be solid, liquid, or gaseous.

Many familiar substances are colloids, as shown in the chart below. In addition to these naturally occurring colloids, modern chemical process industries utilize high shear mixing technology to create novel colloids.

The dispersed-phase particles have a diameter of between approximately 5 and 200 nanometers. Such particles are normally invisible in an optical microscope, though their presence can be confirmed with the use of an ultramicroscope or an electron microscope. Homogeneous mixtures with a dispersed phase in this size range may be called colloidal aerosols, colloidal emulsions, colloidal foams, colloidal dispersions, or hydrosols. The dispersed-phase particles or droplets are affected largely by the surface chemistry present in the colloid.

Some colloids are translucent because of the Tyndall effect, which is the scattering of light by particles in the colloid. Other colloids may be opaque or have a slight color.

Colloidal solutions (also called colloidal suspensions) are the subject of interface and colloid science. This field of study was introduced in 1861 by Scottish scientist Thomas Graham.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA