Sex in a world of fear: Scared rodents produce more offspring

Rodent mothers produce more offspring after smelling odors produced by frightened males. This is reported by a team of biologists from Finland and the Netherlands and bring new information the proximate and ultimate explanations ...

Understanding the fruit fly's nose

How odours influence actions is one of the fundamental questions in neuroscience. Richard Benton, associate professor at the Center for Integrative Genomics at the University of Lausanne, follows the molecular trail of chemical ...

Plants cut the mustard for basic discoveries in metabolism

You might think you have nothing in common with mustard except hotdogs. Yet based on research in a plant from the mustard family, Salk scientists have discovered a possible explanation for how organisms, including humans, ...

Researchers use voltammetry to probe the brain's chemistry

(Phys.org)—Our brains are constantly awash in chemicals that serve as messengers, transporting signals from one neuron to another.  It's a really nifty system, although scientists still aren't clear on how, exactly, those ...

New study makes key finding in stem cell self-renewal

A University of Minnesota-led research team has proposed a mechanism for the control of whether embryonic stem cells continue to proliferate and stay stem cells, or differentiate into adult cells like brain, liver or skin.

Biochemical cell signals quantified for first time

Just as cell phones and computers transmit data through electronic networks, the cells of your body send and receive chemical messages through molecular pathways. The term "cell signaling" was coined more than 30 years ago ...