Returning land to nature with high-yield farming

The expansion of farmlands to meet the growing food demand of the world's ever expanding population places a heavy burden on natural ecosystems. A new IIASA study however shows that about half the land currently needed to ...

Shedding light on how much carbon tropical forests can absorb

Tropical forest ecosystems are an important part of the global carbon cycle as they take up and store large amounts of CO2. It is, however, uncertain how much this ability differs between forests with high versus low species ...

Banning food waste: Lessons for rural America

While Vermonters support banning food waste from landfills—and a whopping 72 percent already compost or feed food scraps to their pets or livestock—few say they are willing to pay for curbside composting pick-up, new ...

Are sinking soils in the Everglades related to climate change?

Characterized by alligators, airboats, and catfish, the Everglades is a region of swampy wetlands in southern Florida. In addition to the area's role in Florida's tourism industry, the Everglades play a significant part in ...

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Carbon sequestration

Carbon sequestration is a geoengineering technique for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide or other forms of carbon, for the mitigation of global warming. Carbon dioxide is usually captured from the atmosphere through biological, chemical or physical processes. It has been proposed as a way to mitigate the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere released by the burning of fossil fuels.

CO2 may be captured as a pure by-product in processes related to petroleum refining or from flue gases from power generation. CO2 sequestration can then be seen as being synonymous with the storage part of carbon capture and storage which refers to the large-scale, permanent artificial capture and sequestration of industrially-produced CO2 using subsurface saline aquifers, reservoirs, ocean water, aging oil fields, or other carbon sinks.

Sequestration techniques are not instantaneous and when considering their efficacy, consideration has to be given to the fact that they will therefore be acting on future (not current) CO2 levels. These levels are expected by the IPCC to be higher than today's.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA