Related topics: company

Why companies should let their workers join the climate strike

Multinational ice cream company Ben & Jerry's will close its Australian stores for this month's global climate strike and pay staff to attend the protest, amid a growing realization in the business community that planetary ...

In a twist, Colorado asks EPA to lower state's air rating

Colorado took the unusual step of inviting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to downgrade the air quality rating of the state's biggest population center, and not everyone thinks that was a good idea.

Uganda offers lessons in tapping the power of solid waste

In places where municipalities continuously fail to collect and manage waste, authorities tend to concentrate their efforts in a few areas. These are often in a city's wealthier sections. Informal settlements remain under-served ...

Global study reveals most popular marketing metrics

Satisfaction is the most popular metric for marketing decisions around the world, according to a new study from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) Business School.

Friendships factor into start-up success (and failure)

New research co-authored by Cass Business School academics has found entrepreneurial groups with strong friendship bonds are more likely to persist with a failing venture and escalate financial commitment to it.

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Business

A business (also called a firm or an enterprise) is a legally recognized organization designed to provide goods and/or services to consumers. Businesses are predominant in capitalist economies, most being privately owned and formed to earn profit that will increase the wealth of its owners and grow the business itself. The owners and operators of a business have as one of their main objectives the receipt or generation of a financial return in exchange for work and acceptance of risk. Notable exceptions include cooperative enterprises and state-owned enterprises. Socialist systems involve either government agencies, public ownership, state-ownership or direct worker ownership of enterprises and assets that would be run as businesses in a capitalist economy. The distinction between these institutions and a business is that socialist institutions often have alternative or additional goals aside from maximizing or turning a profit.

The etymology of "business" relates to the state of being busy either as an individual or society as a whole, doing commercially viable and profitable work. The term "business" has at least three usages, depending on the scope — the singular usage (above) to mean a particular company or corporation, the generalized usage to refer to a particular market sector, such as "the music business" and compound forms such as agribusiness, or the broadest meaning to include all activity by the community of suppliers of goods and services. However, the exact definition of business, like much else in the philosophy of business, is a matter of debate.

Business Studies, the study of the management of individuals to maintain collective productivity to accomplish particular creative and productive goals (usually to generate profit), is taught as an academic subject in many schools.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA