Old bread becomes new textiles

Is it possible to create textiles from old bread? Akram Zamani, senior lecturer in resource recycling at the University of Borås, wants to find out. And she has already come a long way.

What the wheat genome tells us about wars

First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Joining forces with other European researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have examined the genetic diversity of ...

Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

Electrons are not just little spheres, bouncing through a material like a rubber ball. The laws of quantum physics tell us that electrons behave like waves. In some materials, these electron waves can take on rather complicated ...

The wheat code is finally cracked

Today in the international journal Science, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop. This work will ...

Giving up on your goal? Read this first

So you've set a goal to eat healthier and you've mapped out a plan of attack. You'll replace those chips with fruit for your late-night snack. You'll switch to whole-grain bread. You'll start buying fresh vegetables.

Scientists generate a high-quality wheat A genome sequence

Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), feeding more than 35 percent of the human population and providing about 20 percent of calories and proteins consumed by humans, is a globally important crop due to its enhanced adaptability ...

Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteria

Modern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a new study suggests.

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