Let the europium shine brighter

A stacked nanocarbon antenna makes a rare earth element shine 5 times more brightly than previous designs, with applications in molecular light-emitting devices.

Addressing global warming with new nanoparticles and sunshine

Harvesting sunlight, researchers of the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) published in Materials Today ("Phase-Selective Highly Efficient Nanostructured ...

Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light

A variety of medical devices can be inserted into the gastrointestinal tract to treat, diagnose, or monitor GI disorders. Many of these have to be removed by endoscopic surgery once their job is done. However, MIT engineers ...

Blue-green algae found to produce greenhouse gas methane

An international team of researchers has found that cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) produce the greenhouse gas methane. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes tests they carried out ...

Who controls whom: Algae or sea anemone?

Bleached anemones—those lacking symbiotic algae—do not move toward light, a behavior exhibited by healthy, symbiotic anemones. Published in Coral Reefs, this finding from Carnegie's Shawna Foo, Arthur Grossman, and Ken ...

First South American insect that emits blue light is discovered

Brazilian researchers have discovered a new species of fungus gnat (Keroplatidae) whose larvae emit blue light. The small fly inhabits an Atlantic Rainforest reserve in São Paulo State. This is the first record of a blue ...

Rotation on an eight-shaped path

Chemical engineers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, Germany, have developed the first molecular motor that enables an eight-shaped movement.

Researchers show how railroad worms produce red light

A research group comprising Brazilian and Japanese scientists has discovered how luciferase produced by the railroad worm Phrixothrix hirtus emits red light. Luciferase is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin ...

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Blue Light

Blue Light was a unit of the 5th Special Forces Group that existed into the early 1980s.

According to Col. Charles Beckwith's memoirs, this counter-terrorist group was formed by U.S. Army Special Forces leadership who disagreed with or felt politically threatened by Beckwith's Delta Force. He stated that the unit was supposedly disbanded when the Delta Force went operational. It is rumored to still exist under the same name or covert black ops name.

Rod Lenahan book's Crippled Eagle reports that the creators of Blue Light were asked by top brass of the Pentagon when they had just given the order to found Delta because Beckwith estimated that it would take 24 months to set up its unit . The purpose of Blue Light was to provide a capable counter-terrorism unit until Delta became operational. Blue Light was deactivated shortly after Delta completed its initial certification exercise in July 1978. Allegedly, no Blue Light member applied to Delta nor was asked by Delta to do so. The Blue Light S-2, Capt. Tim Casey, was latter one of the intelligence officers assigned to JTF 1-79 which commanded the ill-fated Operation Ricebowl / Eagle Claw.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA