T. rex bite 'no match for a finch'

Tyrannosaurus rex, renowned for being one of the most fearsome creatures to have ever lived, evolved a bite that was less impressive in relation to its body size than a tiny Galapagos ground finch, scientists say.

Bite force research reveals dinosaur-eating frog

Scientists say that a large, now extinct, frog called Beelzebufo that lived about 68 million years ago in Madagascar would have been capable of eating small dinosaurs.

How sauropods gobbled their way to gigantism

Sauropod dinosaurs are the biggest of all the wonderful behemoths to have ever roamed the Earth. Standing on four solid tree trunk legs, these giants are emblazoned in our hearts, minds and history books as towering Mesozoic ...

Changing views of evolutionary factors at work on earliest mammals

Using 3D-printed replicas of 200-million-year-old mammal teeth and polymers that mimic insect prey, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst this week provide the first laboratory-tested evidence that the ability ...

Stegosaurus bite strength revealed

The first detailed study of a Stegosaurus skull shows that the dinosaur had a stronger bite than suspected, enabling it to eat a wider range of plants than other plant-eating dinosaurs with similarly shaped skulls.

Stag beetle males give nasty nips despite massive jaws

Armed with a ferocious pair of mandibles, male stag beetles appear well prepared to take on the world. 'Their jaws are not just for ornamentation, they really use them to fight', says Jana Goyens from the University of Antwerp, ...

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