Storing energy in plants with electronic roots

By watering bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) with a solution that contains conjugated oligomers, researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have shown that the roots of the plant become electrically ...

Potential of faba beans, rich in protein, has been unlocked

Faba beans have been an excellent source of food protein since pre-historic times, but about 5% of people can't eat them. Now, an international team of researchers has identified the gene responsible for the production of ...

Researchers develop cryogenic coffee grinding technology

Skoltech Ph.D. Dima Smirnov and his colleagues from St. Petersburg, Alexander Saichenko, Vladimir Dvortsov, Mikhail Tkachenko, and Maxim Kukolev developed a cryogenic cooling technology and combined it with a cryogenic grinding ...

How climate change affects Colombia's coffee production

If your day started with a cup of coffee, there's a good chance your morning brew came from Colombia. Home to some of the finest Arabica beans, the country is the world's third largest coffee producer. Climate change poses ...

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Bean

Bean ( /ˈbiːn/) is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of the family Fabaceae (alternately Leguminosae) used for human food or animal feed.

The whole young pods of bean plants, if picked before the pods ripen and dry, are very tender and may be eaten cooked or raw.[citation needed] Thus the term "green beans" means "green" in the sense of unripe (many are in fact not green in color). In some cases, the beans inside the pods of "green beans" are too small to comprise a significant part of the cooked fruit.

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