Navigating the winding road toward driverless mobility

As we all watch automakers and autonomous tech companies team up in various alliances, it's natural to wonder about their significance and what the future will bring. Are we realizing that autonomous driving technology and ...

Opinion: California can't compromise on cars

America's car companies have a long history of being on the wrong side of regulation, and when the Trump team arrived they miscalculated as they always do. This is an industry that opposed seat belts when Ralph Nader advocated ...

Automakers urge California, US to restart mileage talks

Major automobile manufacturers urged the Trump administration and California on Thursday to restart negotiations over vehicle mileage standards to prevent a lengthy legal battle, warning that moving ahead with two sets of ...

Germany's Bosch aims to go carbon-neutral from 2020

Car parts supplier Bosch said Thursday it plans to produce zero net carbon emissions "from 2020" and to spend two billion euros ($2.2 billion) on renewable electricity over the next decade.

Renault wants joint holding with Nissan: media

French car maker Renault wants to create a common holding company with its Japanese partner Nissan that will own 100 percent of both auto manufacturers, the business daily Nikkei reported Friday.

Tesla CEO heads down perilous road in pursuit of profit

Tesla has lost nearly $6 billion since setting out to revolutionize the auto industry 15 years ago, but CEO Elon Musk foresees a profitable future fueled in part by a ride-hailing service made up of electric cars driven by ...

Our misplaced fear of job-stealing robots

Some good news: The robots aren't coming for your job. Experts say fears that rapid advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and automation will leave all of us unemployed are vastly overstated.

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Automotive industry

The automotive industry designs, develops, manufactures, markets, and sells the world's motor vehicles. In 2008, more than 70 million motor vehicles, including cars and commercial vehicles were produced worldwide.

In 2007, a total of 71.9 million new automobiles were sold worldwide: 22.9 million in Europe, 21.4 million in Asia-Pacific, 19.4 million in USA and Canada, 4.4 million in Latin America, 2.4 million in the Middle East and 1.4 million in Africa. The markets in North America and Japan were stagnant, while those in South America and Asia grew strongly. Of the major markets, Russia, Brazil, India and China saw the most rapid growth.

About 250 million vehicles are in use in the United States. Around the world, there were about 806 million cars and light trucks on the road in 2007; they burn over 260 billion gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel yearly. The numbers are increasing rapidly, especially in China and India. In the opinion of some, urban transport systems based around the car have proved unsustainable, consuming excessive energy, affecting the health of populations, and delivering a declining level of service despite increasing investments. Many of these negative impacts fall disproportionately on those social groups who are also least likely to own and drive cars. The sustainable transport movement focuses on solutions to these problems.

In 2008, with rapidly rising oil prices, industries such as the automotive industry, are experiencing a combination of pricing pressures from raw material costs and changes in consumer buying habits. The industry is also facing increasing external competition from the public transport sector, as consumers re-evaluate their private vehicle usage. Roughly half of the US's fifty one light vehicle plants are projected to permanently close in the coming years with the loss of another 200,000 jobs in the sector, on top of the 560,000 jobs lost this decade. As a result, in 2009, China became the largest automobile market in the world.

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