Bluefin tuna reveal global ocean patterns of mercury pollution

Bluefin tuna, a long-lived migratory species that accumulates mercury as it ages, can be used as a global barometer of the heavy metal and the risk posed to ocean life and human health, according to a study by Rutgers and ...

How the amphibians got their vertebrae

A group of ancient amphibians called temnospondyls evolved stiffer spinal columns to adapt to aquatic life, contrary to previous hypotheses, according to a study published June 9, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE ...

Lake habitats are disappearing as the climate changes

Global warming is increasing the temperatures of lakes worldwide—are species finding the temperatures they need to survive? Researchers led by scientists at the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries ...

Biodiversity's healthy byproduct—nutrient-rich seafood

High levels of biodiversity in aquatic settings offers a wide range of vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids crucial for human health, a range of nutrients that are lacking in ecosystems where the number of species have been ...

Adult nocturnal fishflies found to visit flowers for food

Researchers from Kumamoto University (Japan) have found that adult nocturnal fishflies (Neochauliodes amamioshimanus), which are typically aquatic insects, feed on pollen at night. They also present circumstantial evidence ...

Science has not kept pace with aquaculture

Aquaculture—the farming of fish, shellfish, and other aquatic animals for food—has reached unprecedented levels of growth in recent years, but largely without consideration of its impact on individual animals, finds a ...

Cryptic fleshy coat aids larvae in crawling on a moss carpet

The roles of physical structures in animal camouflage are not well known. This study illuminates an overlooked role of a mechanism for camouflage. Dr. Imada investigated how larvae of the long-bodied crane flies achieve uncanny ...

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