LS2 report: rejuvenation for the antiproton decelerator

The Antiproton Decelerator (AD), sometimes known as the Antimatter Factory, is the world's largest source of antimatter and has been operational since 2000. Here, antiprotons are slowed down and sent into the experiments, ...

New antimatter gravity experiments begin at CERN

We learn it at high school: Release two objects of different masses in the absence of friction forces and they fall down at the same rate in Earth's gravity. What we haven't learned, because it hasn't been directly measured ...

Hauling antiprotons around in a van

A team of researchers working on the antiProton Unstable Matter Annihilation (PUMA) project near CERN's particle laboratory, according to a report in Nature, plans to capture a billion antiprotons, put them in a shipping ...

Cosmic collisions at the LHCb experiment

Last week at the 52nd Rencontres de Moriond EW in La Thuile, Italy, the LHCb experiment presented the results of an unprecedented and unusual study. Instead of the usual proton-proton collisions, this time the LHCb detector ...

A new ring to slow down antimatter

You could mistake ELENA for a miniature accelerator. But, unlike most accelerators, it's housed in a hangar and you can take it all in in just a single glance. The biggest difference though, is that it doesn't accelerate ...

Physicists measure force that makes antimatter stick together

Peering at the debris from particle collisions that recreate the conditions of the very early universe, scientists have for the first time measured the force of interaction between pairs of antiprotons. Like the force that ...

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Antiproton

The antiproton (p, pronounced p-bar), which is also sometimes referred to as a negatron, is the antiparticle of the proton. Antiprotons are stable, but they are typically short-lived since any collision with a proton will cause both particles to be annihilated in a burst of energy.

The existence of the antiproton with −1 electric charge, opposite to the +1 electric charge of the proton, was predicted by Paul Dirac in his 1933 Nobel Prize lecture [1]. Dirac received the Nobel Prize for his previous 1928 publication of his Dirac Equation that predicted the existence of positive and negatve solutions to the Energy Equation (E = mc2) of Einstein and the existence of the positron, the antimatter analog to the electron, with positive charge and opposite spin.

The antiproton was experimentally confirmed in 1955 by University of California, Berkeley physicists Emilio Segrè and Owen Chamberlain, for which they were awarded the 1959 Nobel Prize in Physics. An antiproton consists of two up antiquark and one down antiquark (uud). The properties of the antiproton that have been measured all match the corresponding properties of the proton, with the exception that the antiproton has opposite electric charge and magnetic moment than the proton. The question of how matter is different from antimatter remains an open problem, in order to explain how our universe survived the Big Bang and why so little remains of antimatter today in our solar system.[citation needed]

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