How pesticides change the environment

The number of humans on the planet has almost doubled in the past 50 years ‒ and so has global food production. As a result, the use of pesticides and their effect on humans, animals and plants have become more important. ...

Arctic sea-ice loss has widespread effects on wildlife

With sea ice at its lowest point in 1,500 years, how might ecological communities in the Arctic be affected by its continued and even accelerated melting over the next decades? In a review article in the journal Science, ...

In nature, dolphins 'whistle' by name

Wild bottlenose dolphins design unique signature whistles to identify themselves, and they answer when a close cohort calls them by name, researchers said Monday.

Dogs imitate novel human actions and store them in memory

Dogs can learn, retain and replay actions taught by humans after a short delay. According to a new study by Claudia Fugazza and Adám Miklósi, from Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary, this deferred imitation provides ...

Snooping on neighbours gives animals the upper paw

(Phys.org) —Animals that have developed the ability to eavesdrop on their neighbours may have the edge when it comes to finding food and expanding their habitat, a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia ...

Tropical vagrants bigger, stronger survivors

(Phys.org) —Sydney marine researchers are one step further in solving the mystery of how tropical fishes, in response to rising sea temperatures and the impact of climate change, are shifting, and potentially surviving ...

page 4 from 8