Bats adapt their echolocation calls to noise

Bats find their way acoustically when they are flying by using echolocation calls, often also employing them when hunting for food. A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität ...

The pink noise of water quality

Lakes and streams are an essential supply of freshwater. Monitoring their water quality relies on measuring their chemistry. Researchers from ETH Zürich and the British research institute CEH have discovered that dozens ...

Carbon nanotubes for molecular magnetic resonances

Researchers at ICFO have developed a new technique for measuring very weak forces on a molecular scale. Thanks to the use of carbon nanotubes, they have achieved the highest level of sensitivity to date. These results published ...

Hair sensor uncovers hidden signals

An "artificial cricket hair" used as a sensitive flow sensor has difficulty detecting weak, low-frequency signals – they tend to be drowned out by noise. But now, a bit of clever tinkering with the flexibility of the tiny ...

Clamorous city blackbirds

(Phys.org)—Animals have developed a variety of strategies for dealing with increasing noise pollution in their habitats. It is known, for example, that many urban birds sing at a high pitch to differentiate their song from ...

Sound bullets in water

Sound waves are commonly used in applications ranging from ultrasound imaging to hyperthermia therapy, in which high temperatures are induced, for example, in tumors to destroy them. In 2010, researchers at Caltech led by ...

Do dolphins use nonlinear mathematics?

Research from the University of Southampton, which examines how dolphins might process their sonar signals, could provide a new system for man-made sonar to detect targets, such as sea mines, in bubbly water.

page 2 from 5