The Vienna University of Technology (German: Technische Universität Wien, TU Wien; formerly: k.k. Polytechnisches Institut, Imperial and Royal Polytechnic Institute from 1815–1872; Technische Hochschule, College of Technology from 1872–1975) is one of the major universities in Vienna, the capital of Austria. The university finds high international and domestic recognition in teaching as well as in research and is a highly esteemed partner of innovation oriented enterprises.[1] It currently has about 26,200 students (19% foreign students/30% women), eight facilities and about 4,000 staff members (1,800 academics). The university's teaching and research is focused on engineering and natural sciences.

Website
https://www.tuwien.ac.at/en/
Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_University_of_Technology

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Measuring the laws of nature

A physical constant, which is of great importance for basic research, has now be re-measured, with much higher precision than ever before.

How to bend waves to arrive at the right place

Waves do not always spread uniformly into all directions, but can form a remarkable "branched flow." At TU Wien (Vienna) a method has now been developed to control this phenomenon.

Evolution in the gut

Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years.

Light from exotic particle states

A new type of light-emitting diode has been developed at TU Wien. Light is produced from the radiative decay of exciton complexes in layers of just a few atoms thickness.

The random anti-laser

The laser is the perfect light source—as long as it is provided with energy, it generates light of a specific, well-defined colour. However, it is also possible to create its opposite—an object that perfectly absorbs ...

How to freeze heat conduction

Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy.

Superconduction—why does it have to be so cold?

Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. TU Wien has now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional ...

Where does this contamination come from?

When bodies of water become polluted, it is important to find the cause as quickly and as economically as possible. To this end, TU Wien has now developed a new, DNA-based rapid testing procedure.

Superconductors: Resistance is futile

Every standard cable, every wire, every electronic device has some electric resistance. There are, however, superconducting materials with the ability to conduct electrical current with a resistance of exactly zero – at ...

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