The Vienna University of Technology (German: Technische Universität Wien, TU Wien; formerly: k.k. Polytechnisches Institut, Imperial and Royal Polytechnic Institute from 1815–1872; Technische Hochschule, College of Technology from 1872–1975) is one of the major universities in Vienna, the capital of Austria. The university finds high international and domestic recognition in teaching as well as in research and is a highly esteemed partner of innovation oriented enterprises.[1] It currently has about 26,200 students (19% foreign students/30% women), eight facilities and about 4,000 staff members (1,800 academics). The university's teaching and research is focused on engineering and natural sciences.

Website
https://www.tuwien.ac.at/en/
Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_University_of_Technology

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Quantum vacuum: Less than zero energy

Energy is a quantity that must always be positive—at least that's what our intuition tells us. If every single particle is removed from a certain volume until there is nothing left that could possibly carry energy, then ...

A metronome for quantum particles

A new measurement protocol, developed at TU Wien (Vienna), makes it possible to measure the quantum phase of electrons—an important step for attosecond physics.

Single atoms as catalysts

Incorporating individual metal atoms into a surface in the right way allows their chemical behavior to be adapted. This makes new, better catalysts possible.

Slow electrons to combat cancer

Ion beams are often used today in cancer treatment: this involves electrically charged atoms being fired at the tumour to destroy cancer cells. Although, it's not actually the ions themselves that cause the decisive damage. ...

Ultrathin transistors for faster computer chips

For decades, the transistors on our microchips have become smaller, faster and cheaper. Approximately every two years the number of transistors on commercial chips has doubled—this phenomenon became known as "Moore's Law." ...

Measuring the laws of nature

A physical constant, which is of great importance for basic research, has now be re-measured, with much higher precision than ever before.

How to bend waves to arrive at the right place

Waves do not always spread uniformly into all directions, but can form a remarkable "branched flow." At TU Wien (Vienna) a method has now been developed to control this phenomenon.

Evolution in the gut

Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years.

Light from exotic particle states

A new type of light-emitting diode has been developed at TU Wien. Light is produced from the radiative decay of exciton complexes in layers of just a few atoms thickness.

page 1 from 21