The U.S. Forest Service was formed in 1905 and is currently an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Forest Service manages 155 National Parks and wetlands in the United States. The U.S. Forest Service has overlapping control with other agencies involving habitat protection, water and maintenance of National Monuments. The primary role is to preserve and protect national forests and the ecosystem necessary to support it. The Forest Service publishes informative guides, trains and employs forest rangers and maintains public lands.

Address
National Headquarters USDA Forest Service 1400 Independence Ave., SW Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
Website
http://www.fs.fed.us
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Forest_Service

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Forest Service debuts state-by-state statistics on carbon

For the first time, a new publication by the USDA Forest Service delivers an overview of the status and trends of greenhouse gas emissions and removals from forest land, woodlands, hardwood products, and urban trees nationally ...

Landscape patterns matter

The size, shape, and arrangement of fields, forests, wetlands, and human populations, and the ways these and other features interact and change across landscapes, have a multitude of implications for resource sustainability, ...

Neotropical cloud forests to lose what most defines them: clouds

In as few as 25 years, climate change could shrink and dry 60-80% of Western Hemisphere cloud forests, finds a study published today. If greenhouse gas emissions continue increasing as they have been, 90% of Western Hemisphere ...

Think the tick threat grows with the grass? Not necessarily

When Susannah Lerman talked with fellow researchers and friends about her study of the effects of less frequent lawn mowing to improve habitat for native bees, the response she heard most had nothing to do with bees. "The ...

Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable

In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones—with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s—and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted.

page 1 from 23