Microbes leave 'fingerprints' on Martian rocks

Scientists around Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna are in search of unique biosignatures, which are left on synthetic extraterrestrial minerals by microbial activity. The biochemist ...

Sharing of science is most likely among male scientists

Even though science is becoming increasingly competitive, scientists are still very willing to share their work with colleagues. This is especially true for male scientists among each other and less so for females among each ...

Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints

Researchers at the Universities of Vienna and Göttingen have succeeded in developing a method for predicting molecular infrared spectra based on artificial intelligence. These chemical "fingerprints" could only be simulated ...

The evolutionary origin of the gut

How did the gut, the skin and musculature evolve? This question concerns scientists for more than a century. Through the investigation of the embryonic development of sea anemones, a very old animal lineage, researchers from ...

Clever cockatoos bend hooks into straight wire to fish for food

In the early 2000s the New Caledonian crow Betty in Oxford shocked the world when she spontaneously bent a hook into a straight piece of wire while trying to retrieve a small out-off-reach basket with a handle from a vertical ...

Physicists measure molecular electronic properties of vitamins

Quantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team at the University of Vienna has demonstrated ...

Massive particles test standard quantum theory

In quantum mechanics particles can behave as waves and take many paths through an experiment. It requires only combinations of pairs of paths, rather than three or more, to determine the probability for a particle to arrive ...

Magnetic quantum objects in a 'nano egg carton'

Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called "fluxons," are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed ...

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