The University of Geneva (French: Université de Genève) is a public research university located in Geneva, Switzerland. It was founded in 1559 by John Calvin, as a theological seminary and law school. It remained focused on theology until the 17th century, when it became a center for Enlightenment scholarship. In 1873, it dropped its religious affiliations and became officially secular. Today, the university is the second-largest university in Switzerland. It has programs in various fields but is particularly acknowledged for its academic and research programs in international relations (with Geneva being hostess to a dense agglomeration of international organizations), law, astrophysics, astronomy, genetics (with a record of prominent contributions to the fields of planetary science, genetics, developmental psychology, neuroscience, and theology ). The university holds and actively pursues teaching, research, and community service as its primary objectives. In 2009, the University of Geneva celebrated the 450th anniversary of its founding. The university is a member of the League of European Research Universities.

Address
Bd du Pont-d'Arve 40, Geneva, Switzerland CH-1211
Website
http://www.unige.ch/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Geneva

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Immigrants: Citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked

How many immigrants per year should Switzerland be prepared to welcome? Do the figures put forward by political parties and conveyed by the media play a role in influencing public opinion? Psychologists from the University ...

A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation

How, where and when genes are expressed determine individual phenotypes. If gene expression is controlled by many regulatory elements, what, ultimately, controls them? And how does genetic variation affect them? The SysGenetiX ...

Five planets revealed after 20 years of observation

Over 4000 exoplanets have been discovered since the first one in 1995, but the vast majority of them orbit their stars with relatively short periods of revolution. Indeed, to confirm the presence of a planet, it is necessary ...

Seeds inherit memories from their mother

Seeds remain in a dormant state, a temporary blockage of their germination, as long as environmental conditions are not ideal for germination. The depth of this dormancy, which is influenced by various factors, is inherited ...

Human enhancement: Is it good for society?

Human enhancement technologies are opening up tremendous new possibilities. But they're also raising important questions about what it means to be human, and what is good or bad for our individual and collective well-being. ...

A solid scaffolding for cells

To perform the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines." But how do they recognize their partners at the right time? Researchers at the University of Geneva ...

The feminization of men leads to a rise in homophobia

Before the feminist revolution in the late 1960s, men largely built their masculinity on traits that opposed those ascribed to women. Since then, society has been moving increasingly toward gender equality, and men can no ...

Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?

Often considered immortal, the freshwater Hydra can regenerate any part of its body, a trait discovered by the Geneva naturalist Abraham Trembley nearly 300 years ago. Any fragment of its body containing a few thousands cells ...

How our cellular antennas are formed

Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium, an antenna used to transfer information from the surrounding environment. Some cells also have many mobile cilia that are used to generate movement. The 'skeleton' of ...

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