The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) was originally established as a teacher's college in 1907. In 1944, UCSB joined the University of California system and represents one of the 10 sister campuses of the UC system. UCSB has a student enrollment of 20,000 plus in the graduate and undergraduate programs. Today, five Nobel Laureates are on the faculty of UCSB. Finn E. Kydland—Economics, David J. Gross—Physics, Alan J. Heeger—Chemistry, Herbert Kroemer—Physics and Walter Kohn—Chemistry. UCSB features the Center for Biologically Inspired Nanocomposite Materials, Center for Nanotechnology for Treatment, Understanding and Monitoring of Cancer, Center for Nanotechnology in Society, The Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and approximately eight other specialized institutes for research in science. UCSB has a strong computing and technology component. Research abstracts are published on-line and further information is available through the Public External Affairs Center.

Address
University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2100
Website
http://www.ucsb.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_California,_Santa_Barbara

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From droplet to discovery

Stem cells overflow with potential. Their ability to become other cell types is crucial to our bodies, both during development and throughout life. But this potential can be our very downfall if it goes wrong, turning some ...

Physicists shed light on a different kind of chaos

Physicists at UC Santa Barbara, the University of Maryland, and the University of Washington have found an answer to the longstanding physics question: How do interparticle interactions affect dynamical localization?

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In mythologies and origin stories around the world, various cultures and religions point to clay as the vessel of life, the primordial material that creator gods imbued with a self-sustaining existence. Nowadays we have biology ...

Exploring the limits of a new kind of chemo

Chemotherapy sucks. The treatments generally have awful side effects, and it's no secret that the drugs involved are often toxic to the patient as well as their cancer. The idea is that, since cancers grow so quickly, chemotherapy ...

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