Diamonds grow like trees, but over millions of years

Diamonds consist of highly compressed carbon atoms and develop deep underground at relatively high pressures and temperatures of over 1000 degrees Celsius. Earth scientists from VU University Amsterdam show that diamonds ...

Physicists publish solution to the quantum measurement problem

(Phys.org) —Quantum mechanics is a highly successful theory, but its interpretation has still not been settled. In their recent opus magnum, Theo Nieuwenhuizen (Institute of Physics, UvA) and colleagues claim to have found ...

Punishment promotes human cooperation when people trust each other

(Phys.org) —Why does the effectiveness of punishment to promote contributions to public goods differ among countries? According to psychologists Daniel Balliet and Paul van Lange at VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ...

Information transmission a good predictor of credit crisis

The recent credit crisis was preceded by a sharp increase in the transmission of information in the largest derivatives market. Such transmissions can therefore serve as indicators for the instability of the market. A team ...

Common swifts make mysterious twilight ascents

Common swifts climb to altitudes of up to 2.5 km both at dawn and dusk. This unexpected behaviour was discovered by geo-ecologist Dr Adriaan Dokter of the University of Amsterdam's (UvA) Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem ...

Rhesus monkeys cannot hear beat in music

(Phys.org)—Beat induction, the ability to pick up regularity – the beat – from a varying rhythm, is not an ability that rhesus monkeys possess. These are the findings of researchers from the University of Amsterdam ...

Sandcastle building is no child's play, say physicists

All children who build sandcastles on the beach know that in addition to sand you also need to add a little water to prevent the structure from collapsing. But why is this? In an article which appeared today in Scientific ...

Dutch computer scientists present smile database

What exactly happens to your face when you smile spontaneously, and how does that affect how old you look? Computer scientists from the University of Amsterdam's (UvA) Faculty of Science recorded the smiles of hundreds of ...

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