Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen (German: Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, sometimes called the "Eberhardina Carolina") is a public university located in the city of Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is one of Germany's oldest universities, internationally noted in medicine, natural sciences and the humanities. In the area of German Studies (German: Germanistik) it has been ranked first among all German universities for many years. Tübingen is one of five classical "university towns" in Germany; the other four being Marburg, Göttingen, Freiburg and Heidelberg. The university is associated with some Nobel laureates, especially in the fields of medicine and chemistry. Currently, around 22,000 students are enrolled. The 17 hospitals in Tübingen affiliated with the university's faculty of medicine have 1,500 patient beds, and cater to 66,000 in-patients and 200,000 out-patients on an annual basis. In the 2011 QS World University Rankings the University of Tübingen was ranked 152nd in the world, making it the seventh highest ranked university in Germany.

Address
Geschwister-Scholl-Platz, Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Website
http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/

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Forest plants now flower a week earlier than a century ago

Early flowering plants in European forests today start their flowering season on average a week earlier than they did a hundred years ago. This is reflected by herbarium specimens, as Dr. Franziska Willems and Professor Oliver ...

Researchers gain insights into Rio Tinto microbial community

At the mouth of the Rio Tinto in southwestern Spain, acidic river water—polluted with heavy metals from ore mining and mineral weathering—mixes with the salt water of the Atlantic Ocean. Here, microorganisms that love ...

Late Neanderthals used complex tool-making techniques

Neanderthals living in the Swabian Jura more than 45,000 years ago used sophisticated techniques with many different production strategies to make stone tools. The Heidenschmiede site has yielded many stone tools and by-products ...

Chimpanzees have not entered the stone age

Unlike early human species, chimpanzees do not seem to be able to spontaneously make and use sharp stone tools, even when they have all the materials and incentive to do so. That was the finding of a study of a total of eleven ...

Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils

Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, ...

Forest use changes life cycles of wildflowers

One of the most striking features of global warming is that the life rhythms of plants are changing all over the world. A study at the University of Tübingen has found that human land use can also significantly influence ...

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