SINTEF (Norwegian: Stiftelsen for industriell og teknisk forskning), headquartered in Trondheim, Norway, is the largest independent research organisation in Scandinavia. Every year, SINTEF supports research and development at 2,000 or so Norwegian and overseas companies via its research and development activity. The acronym SINTEF means "The Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research". SINTEF was established at the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH) in Trondheim in 1950 and expanded rapidly in the following years. The largest expansion came in 1993 when the "Centre for Industrial Research" in Oslo merged with SINTEF and created the SINTEF Oslo campus. SINTEF has approximately 2100 (2010) employees, most of whom are located in Trondheim, and approximately 350 of whom are in Oslo. There are also offices in Bergen, Stavanger, Tromsø, Raufoss and Ålesund, in addition to overseas offices in Houston, Texas (USA); Rio De Janeiro, Brazil; and Hirtshals, Denmark (the Hirtshals location being a laboratory installation). SINTEF works in close cooperation with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim and with the University of Oslo (UiO).

Address
Oslo, Norway
Website
http://www.sintef.no/

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Better fish welfare using 'sensor fish'

After many decades of salmon farming, recent years have seen studies into fish welfare in connection with issues such as how fish are treated in their cages. In particular, the fish farming sector is looking for better approaches ...

Electric cars are a hazard for blind people

Electric cars are good for the environment – but not for people who cannot see. They have problems detecting the silent vehicles. However, Norwegian research scientists are working on a solution.

Entrepreneurs aim to end ghostfishing

A small device, developed in Norway, will now be used in the battle against environmentally-unfriendly ghost fishing caused by lost or forgotten fishing gear.

New filter removes run-off chemicals

Surface water run-off in urban areas is often highly contaminated. It is therefore important to make it as clean as possible before it pollutes the natural environment.

Robot vision makes solar cell manufacture more efficient

"The price of solar-generated electricity continues to plummet, and the technology is taking over as the least expensive form of energy in more and more parts of the world," says solar cell researcher John Atle Bones at SINTEF.

Capturing CO2 using heat pumps

Capturing the greenhouse gas CO2 from industrial processes such as cement manufacture is a demanding and therefore expensive exercise. However, by introducing a renewable powered heat pump in the capture system, the energy ...

Salmon delivered by hyperloop and mail by drone?

Developments in technology will leave their mark on Norwegian roads. More advanced IT systems make self-driving cars possible, as well as drones that can deliver parcel post – with built-in intelligence. Hyperloop technology ...

Measuring devices for the world's most extreme environment

Norwegian research scientists are contributing to the development of the world's hottest geothermal well in a non-volcanic area. The goal is to exploit the inexhaustible supply of heat from the interior of the Earth, and ...

Preventing hurricanes using air bubbles

Many people have tried to find ways of preventing hurricanes before they make landfall, resulting in the loss of human lives. Norwegian researchers believe that the answer lies in cold bubbles.

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