Rothamsted Research

Rothamsted Research, previously known as the Rothamsted Experimental Station and then the Institute of Arable Crops Research, is one of the oldest agricultural research institutions in the world, having been founded in 1843. It is located at Harpenden in the English county of Hertfordshire and is a registered charity under English law.

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

First step to lasting wheat health

Substantial reductions in a deadly root disease of wheat crops and corresponding increases in yields of grain and straw mark a significant advance in the continuing war to protect the staple cereal from the ravages of the ...

dateJun 22, 2018 in Biotechnology
shares5 comments 0

How wheat can root out the take-all fungus

In the soils of the world's cereal fields, a family tussle between related species of fungi is underway for control of the crops' roots, with food security threatened if the wrong side wins. Beneficial fungi can help plants ...

dateMay 22, 2018 in Biotechnology
shares8 comments 0

Where GM meets GE

Genome edited (GE) crops will be sown in a field this month for the first time in the UK as part of an experimental trial at Rothamsted Research that aims to investigate genetic engineering's efficiency in developing plants ...

dateMay 18, 2018 in Biotechnology
shares12 comments 0

Prized data, free and open to all

The first official account of the electronic Rothamsted Archive and what it offers, published today, highlights how this unique historical repository of agricultural and meteorological data, which date back to 1843, is the ...

dateMay 15, 2018 in Environment
shares4 comments 0

Healthy soil lifts animal weight

Individual pastures on livestock farms yield surprisingly dissimilar benefits to a farm's overall agricultural income, and those differences are most likely attributable to the varying levels of "soil health" provided by ...

dateApr 13, 2018 in Environment
shares18 comments 0

Keys found to bee-friendly neonics

Discovery of why two of the most economically important bee species are immune to one neonicotinoid insecticide but not to others promises to yield chemical treatments that protect crops from pests without harming these essential ...

dateMar 22, 2018 in Ecology
shares323 comments 0

Soil cannot halt climate change

Unique soils data from long-term experiments, stretching back to the middle of the nineteenth century, confirm the practical implausibility of burying carbon in the ground to halt climate change, an option once heralded as ...

dateFeb 28, 2018 in Environment
shares38 comments 1