The Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) is an international center for research and education in biology, biomedicine and ecology. Founded in 1888, the MBL is the oldest independent marine laboratory in the Americas, taking advantage of a coastal setting in the Cape Cod village of Woods Hole, Massachusetts. As of 2009, 54 MBL-affiliated scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize. The MBL has three main research centers: the Ecosystems Center; the Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution; and the Whitman Center for Research and Discovery. Each year, hundreds of scientists from around the world come to the MBL to conduct research. Often, they form collaborations at the MBL that continue throughout their professional lifetimes. Serendipitous encounters at the MBL have historically led to leaps in scientific understanding. One example is the meeting of Franklin Stahl and Matthew Meselson at the MBL in the summer of 1954, when they conceived their crucial experiment to demonstrate the semi-conservative replication of DNA (Holmes, 2001: 60-70).

Website
http://www.mbl.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Biological_Laboratory

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Quick-learning cuttlefish pass 'the marshmallow test'

Much like the popular TikTok challenge where kids resist eating snacks, cuttlefish can do the same! Cuttlefish can delay gratification—wait for a better meal rather than be tempted by the one at hand—and those that can ...

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To push or to pull? How many-limbed marine organisms swim

When you think of swimming, you probably imagine pushing through the water—creating backwards thrust that pushes you forward. New research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) suggests instead that many marine animals ...

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