Leiden University (Dutch: Universiteit Leiden), located in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. The university was founded in 1575 by William, Prince of Orange, leader of the Dutch Revolt in the Eighty Years' War. The royal Dutch House of Orange-Nassau and Leiden University still have a close relationship. The Queens Juliana and Beatrix and crown-prince Willem-Alexander studied at Leiden University. In 2005 Queen Beatrix received a rare honorary degree from Leiden University. Leiden University has six faculties, over 50 departments and more than 150 undergraduate programmes and enjoys an outstanding international reputation. Shanghai Jiao Tong University's 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities ranks Leiden University as the 65th best university worldwide. Times Higher Education World University Rankings consistently rank Leiden University as the best university in Continental Europe for Arts and Humanities. The University is associated with at least sixteen recipients of the Nobel Prize. The university is a member of the distinguished Coimbra Group, the Europaeum and the League of European Research Universities.

Address
Rapenburg 70, Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
Website
http://www.leiden.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leiden_University

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The nose of E. coli zips open and closed

With ice-cold electron microscopy microbiologists from Leiden gain more insight into how bacteria respond to their environment. Publication in mBio.

Effect of insecticides on damselflies greater than expected

The latest research from the Leiden outdoor laboratory "Living Lab' shows that the insecticide thiacloprid strongly influences even the most common and robust dragonfly species in the Netherlands. The study was published ...

The impact of the slave trade on the Dutch economy

To what extent did the Netherlands grow rich from the Transatlantic slave trade? In his dissertation "Walcherse Ketens," Gerhard de Kok looks at Vlissingen and Middelburg, the most important slave trade cities in the Netherlands ...

The dark side of personality

Social life entails countless situations in which people have to trust each other. From mundane family matters to profane issues such as trade negotiations among world leaders in a conflicted globalized world—all require ...

We finally understand how oxygen reacts on platinum

Platinum is a widely used catalyst, but its precise mechanism largely remains a mystery to scientists. Ludo Juurlink has now demonstrated for the first time how oxygen reacts on the platinum surface. Together with Ph.D. students ...

Using computer simulations to discover where Neanderthals lived

Archaeologist Fulco Sherjon has used computer simulations to identify where and how Neanderthals lived in West Europe. What stood out was that they probably had lots of children and lived in smaller groups than was previously ...

The building blocks for astronomically literate citizens

What does it mean for a citizen to be literate in astronomy? Astronomers who participate in outreach to the general public experience various degrees of astronomical knowledge among people. But so far, there had not been ...

Nanoparticles can aid in stroke therapy

Tiny selenium particles could have a therapeutic effect on ischemic brain strokes by promoting the recovery of brain damage. Pharmacologists, including Alireza Mashaghi from the Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research discovered ...

The most stable microscope in the world

Ph.D. candidate Irene Battisti of the Leiden Institute of Physics has developed the most vibration-free cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope in the world. The new microscope could shed light on unconventional superconductivity.

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