The Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) is a publicly funded research organization dedicated to basic and applied research in quantum physics, with particular emphasis on quantum information science. Located on the campus of the University of Maryland (UMD) at College Park, Maryland, Joint Quantum Institute was created on September 11, 2006 by a joint memorandum of understanding among University of Maryland, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Laboratory for Physical Sciences. It has a base annual budget of approximately $6 million, which supports both theory and experimental research by Joint Quantum Institute’s 27 Fellows, associated graduate students and postdoctoral scientists. Joint Quantum Institute’s co-directors are Steve Rolston, Professor of Physics at University of Maryland, and Charles W. Clark, Adjunct Professor of Physics at University of Maryland. Approximately half the Joint Quantum Institute fellows are from University of Maryland and half from NIST. One is from the Laboratory for Physical Sciences, a university-government facility adjacent to the UMD College Park campus.

Website
http://jqi.umd.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joint_Quantum_Institute

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Researchers generate tunable twin particles of light

Identical twins might seem 'indistinguishable,' but in the quantum world the word takes on a new level of meaning. While identical twins share many traits, the universe treats two indistinguishable quantum particles as intrinsically ...

Enhanced frequency doubling adds to photonics toolkit

The digital age has seen electronics, including computer chips, shrink in size at an amazing rate, with ever tinier chips powering devices like smartphones, laptops and even autonomous drones. In the wake of this progress, ...

Mind and space bending physics on a convenient chip

Thanks to Einstein, we know that our three-dimensional space is warped and curved. And in curved space, normal ideas of geometry and straight lines break down, creating a chance to explore an unfamiliar landscape governed ...

Quantum gases won't take the heat

The quantum world blatantly defies intuitions that we've developed while living among relatively large things, like cars, pennies and dust motes. In the quantum world, tiny particles can maintain a special connection over ...

Peeking into a world of spin-3/2 materials

Researchers have been pushing the frontiers of the quantum world for over a century. And time after time, spin has been a rich source of new physics.

Charting a course toward quantum simulations of nuclear physics

In nuclear physics, like much of science, detailed theories alone aren't always enough to unlock solid predictions. There are often too many pieces, interacting in complex ways, for researchers to follow the logic of a theory ...

Stretched photons recover lost interference

The smallest pieces of nature—individual particles like electrons, for instance—are pretty much interchangeable. An electron is an electron is an electron, regardless of whether it's stuck in a lab on Earth, bound to ...

Ions clear another hurdle toward scaled-up quantum computing

Scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) have been steadily improving the performance of ion trap systems, a leading platform for future quantum computers. Now, a team of researchers led by JQI Fellows Norbert Linke ...

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