Diamond Light Source

Diamond Light Source is the UK's national synchrotron science facility, located at the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus in Oxfordshire. By accelerating electrons to near light-speed, Diamond generates brilliant beams of light from infra-red to X-rays which are used for academic and industry research and development across a range of scientific disciplines including structural biology, physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, earth and environmental sciences.

Address
Diamond House Harwell Science and Innovation Campus Didcot Oxfordshire OX11 0DE
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Nanoparticles form supercrystals under pressure

Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. Obtaining high-quality supercrystals is slow, dependent on forming ...

dateSep 07, 2018 in Nanomaterials
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Magnetic vortices observed in haematite

Vortices are common in nature, but their formation can be hampered by long range forces. In work recently published in Nature Materials, an international team of researchers has used mapped X-ray magnetic linear and circular ...

dateAug 13, 2018 in General Physics
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A surprising twist on skyrmions

Vortex structures are common in nature, reaching from swirls in our morning coffee to spiral galaxies in the universe. Vortices are been best known from fluid dynamics. Take the example of a tornado. Air circulates around ...

dateJun 12, 2018 in General Physics
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Metallic drivers of Alzheimer's disease

X-ray spectromicroscopy at the Scanning X-ray Microscopy beamline (I08), here at Diamond, has been utilised to pinpoint chemically reduced iron and calcium compounds within protein plaques derived from brains of Alzheimer's ...

dateMay 17, 2018 in Bio & Medicine
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Shedding new light on laser additive manufacturing

Additive manufacturing (AM, also known as 3-D printing) allows us to create incredibly complex shapes, which would not be possible using traditional manufacturing techniques. However, objects created using AM have different ...

dateApr 11, 2018 in Engineering
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