Diamond Light Source is the UK's national synchrotron science facility, located at the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus in Oxfordshire. By accelerating electrons to near light-speed, Diamond generates brilliant beams of light from infra-red to X-rays which are used for academic and industry research and development across a range of scientific disciplines including structural biology, physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, earth and environmental sciences.

Address
Diamond House Harwell Science and Innovation Campus Didcot Oxfordshire OX11 0DE
Website
http://www.diamond.ac.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_Light_Source

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Demonstrating a weak topological insulator in bismuth iodide

Topological insulators are one of the most exciting discoveries of the 21st century. They can be simply described as materials that conduct electricity on their surface or edge, but are insulating in their interior bulk. ...

Structural insights into tiny bacterial harpoons

New research sheds light onto how different bacterial species can build complex nano-harpoons with different protein building blocks. Bacteria use these harpoons called Type VI secretion systems to inject toxins into nearby ...

Spare 10 minutes to make science leap forward

Today sees the launch of an innovative Citizen Science Project by Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron science facility.The project uses a crowdsourcing model to call on people of all ages around the world ...

Saving Rembrandt for future generations

The surface of many Old Master paintings has been affected by the appearance of whitish lead-rich deposits, which are often difficult to fully characterise, thereby hindering conservation. Painted in 1663, Rembrandt's Homer ...

Nanoparticles form supercrystals under pressure

Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. Obtaining high-quality supercrystals is slow, dependent on forming ...

Magnetic vortices observed in haematite

Vortices are common in nature, but their formation can be hampered by long range forces. In work recently published in Nature Materials, an international team of researchers has used mapped X-ray magnetic linear and circular ...

Blending liquid MOFs produces new glass materials

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of crystalline materials with a structure of inorganic nodes connected by organic ligands. There are currently more than 60,000 known MOFs, and they are being investigated as promising ...

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