The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: Organisation européenne pour la recherche nucléaire), known as CERN ( /ˈsɜrn/; French pronunciation: [sɛʁn]; see History), is an international organization whose purpose is to operate the world's largest particle physics laboratory, which is situated in the northwest suburbs of Geneva on the Franco–Swiss border (46°14′3″N 6°3′19″E? / ?46.23417°N 6.05528°E? / 46.23417; 6.05528). Established in 1954, the organization has twenty European member states. The term CERN is also used to refer to the laboratory itself, which employs just under 2400 full-time employees, as well as some 7931 scientists and engineers representing 608 universities and research facilities and 113 nationalities. CERN's main function is to provide the particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high-energy physics research. Numerous experiments have been constructed at CERN by international collaborations to make use of them. It is also the birthplace of the World Wide Web.

Address
1211 Genève 23, Geneva, Canton of Geneva, Switzerland
Website
http://www.cern.ch/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CERN

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Large Hadron Collider ATLAS moves into top gear for Run 3

After over three years of upgrade and maintenance work, the Large Hadron Collider began its third period of operation (Run 3) in July 2022. Since then, the world's most powerful particle accelerator has been colliding protons ...

CMS completes release of its entire Run 1 proton-proton data

The CMS experiment is one of the largest international scientific collaborations in history, with a broad program of activities at the forefront of particle physics research. As of December 5, 2022, all of the proton-proton ...

Exploring the hidden charm of quark-gluon plasma

Quark–gluon plasma is an extremely hot and dense state of matter in which the elementary constituents—quarks and gluons—are not confined inside composite particles called hadrons, as they are in the protons and neutrons ...

LHCf continues to investigate cosmic rays

LHCf has completed its first data-taking period during LHC Run 3, taking advantage of the record 13.6 TeV collision energy. This coincides with the machine's record fill time of 57 hours.

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